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Field Guide

Baseball Field Dimensions: What You Need To Know

July 12, 2021

Diagram of a baseball field done in water colors.

When it comes to designing your baseball field, it’s important to make sure the layout and dimensions match the level of play the field is being used for (e.g. a Little League field will have different dimensions than a major league field). This helps ensure unbiased, consistent play across fields for athletes, keeping the game fair for all teams.

Before discussing baseball field measurements, there are a few baseball-specific terms to understand when talking about how to measure your field. Browse over the short glossary below for an initial reference:

Baseball Field Glossary

  • Backstop — The tall fence behind home plate that protects from errant pitches and foul balls.
  • Baseline — The direct line between bases. Each baseline is the same length as the other, creating a perfect square shape.
  • Center field fence — The section of fence in the middle part of the outfield. Center field fence measurements start from the back of home plate in a straight line to the center field fence.
  • Foul line — A set of two straight lines chalked on the field that start at the back of home plate and go all the way to the left field and right field fences, respectively. Foul lines are used to designate the division between fair territory and foul territory.
  • Pitcher’s mound — Known also as the hill, the pitcher’s mound is an elevated portion of the infield with a pitching rubber in its center. From here, the pitcher delivers pitches to the batter.
  • Pitching rubber — A white, rectangular rubber slab on the middle of the pitcher’s mound from which the pitcher pushes off with his or her foot to build velocity toward home plate when pitching the ball.

How to Properly Measure a Baseball Field

For all measurements listed, the starting point is the back of home plate (the white part, not the black rubber). That’s the pointed part that goes toward the catcher and backstop. Here’s how to measure baselines:

  • Home to first — Measure from the back white part of home plate to the back corner of first base.
  • First to second — Measure from the back corner of first base to the exact middle of second base.
  • Second to third — Measure from the exact middle of second base to the back corner of third base.
  • Third to home — Measure from the back corner of third base to the back of home plate.

Now that you know how to measure your field, let’s take a look at the proper dimensions for different levels of play:

Pinto

  • Baseline — 50 feet
  • Home to second —70 feet 8 inches
  • Home to front of pitching rubber —38 feet
  • Radius of skinned infield — 50 feet
  • Home plate to backstop — 20 feet
  • Foul lines — 125 feet minimum to fence
  • Center field fence — 200-plus feet

Little League

  • Baseline — 60 feet
  • Home to second — 84 feet 10 ¼ inches
  • Home to front of pitching rubber — 46 feet
  • Area of skinned infield — 50 feet
  • Home plate to backstop — 25 feet
  • Foul lines — 175 feet minimum to fence
  • Center field fence — 225-plus feet

Bronco

  • Baseline — 70 feet
  • Home to second — 99 feet
  • Home to front of pitching rubber — 48 feet
  • Area of skinned infield — 65 feet
  • Home plate to backstop — 30 feet
  • Foul lines — 200 feet minimum to lines
  • Center field fence— 250-plus feet

Pony

  • Baseline — 80 feet
  • Home to second — 113 feet 2 inches
  • Home to front of pitching rubber — 54 feet
  • Area of skinned infield — 80 feet
  • Home plate to backstop — 40 feet
  • Foul lines — 250 feet minimum to lines
  • Center field fence— 300-plus feet

High School, College, and Pro

  • Baseline 90 feet
  • Home to second 127 feet 3 3/8 inches
  • Home to front of pitching rubber — 60 feet 6 inches
  • Area of skinned infield — 95 feet
  • Home plate to backstop — 60 feet
  • Foul lines — 320 feet minimum to fence
  • Center field fence— 400-plus feet

If you don’t have a permanent fence on your baseball field or if you need to repurpose an existing baseball field to fit the standard dimensions for different levels of play, temporary baseball fences are an excellent solution. The best portable baseball fences have a yellow home run marker, are easy to set up and take down as needed, and durable.

Now you have all the measurements you need to build your own field of dreams. While distance changes at each level, the importance of maintaining your field, keeping it in good, safe condition never varies — so always make field maintenance a priority. Now, let’s play ball!

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